Robotic Surgery Videos [Mechanical engineering]

Robotic Surgery Videos

How Videogames Could Help Train the Next Generation of Robotic

Dr. Sami Kilic oversees doctors training to become surgeons at a hospital in Galveston, Texas, and he’s also the parent of a teenage boy. Like many parents, Kilic is concerned about how much time his son spends playing videogames. But now he’s also worried that his resident physicians aren’t playing them enough.

According to a study by Kilic and others at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, doling out death in the virtual world of first-person-shooter games might help the next generation of surgeons save lives in the real world. The study, presented at a meeting of the American Gynecologic Laparoscopists in Las Vegas in November, used simulators to compare the robotic surgery skills of med school residents against college and high school students who spend a lot of their time playing videogames — and the videogamers won.

Robotic surgery — where robotic machinery helps surgeons perform certain tasks through very small incisions — is growing rapidly, despite the criticism that these procedures are expensive and may not be any more safe than traditional minimally invasive operations. In recent years, around 75 percent of all prostate cancer surgeries are now done with Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci Surgical Systems machines, according to the company (.pdf).

Intuitive Surgical — which currently enjoys a monopoly on robotic surgery equipment — also reports (.pdf) that there was a 29 percent increase in robotic-assisted surgeries from 2010 to 2010, and the number climbed another 24 percent from 2011 to 2012. For better or worse, the next generation of surgeons will likely need to learn to operate robotic equipment.

Much like videogames, robotic surgery controls require the use of both hands, and require operators to monitor their activities on a screen. Surgeons are trained to operate these machines on simulators. Rather than removing tumors or suturing wounds, the simulator has trainees conduct various activities meant to develop and assess fine motor skills. For example, a resident may be asked manipulate small objects — such as tiny hoops — using small clips.

Kilic says his son was able to just sit down at one of these simulators and start using it with practically no training — and he did very well. That made Kilic rethink his concern over his son’s videogames. “I took it more seriously, ” he said. “I started playing his computer games. As you can imagine, he beat me up on all the games we played together.”

Then Kilic started asking his residents, who are 31 years old on average, whether they played videogames. Most of them said no. Electronic games weren’t as popular when they were growing up, and now they didn’t have time.



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FAQ

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Where can I purchase a video of Surgery. I am interested in Robotic Heart surgery on Video.? | Yahoo Answers

you can try looking on the dicovery ch. web site and maybe someone there can help you... or ask your doctor if he knows a place, try a library

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