Robotic Surgery for prostate [Mechanical engineering]

Robotic Surgery for prostate

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A billboard advertising robotic surgery hangs outside Boston's Fenway Park in 2009. Hospitals and doctors have heavily promoted robotic surgery. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

toggle caption Charles Krupa/AP

A billboard advertising robotic surgery hangs outside Boston's Fenway Park in 2009. Hospitals and doctors have heavily promoted robotic surgery.

Charles Krupa/AP

Pretty much every medical organization has told men to back off on screening for prostate cancer, because it can lead to unneeded treatment, including surgery that can leave a man incontinent and impotent.

But it's hard to resist a robot.

Men who have been diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer increasingly choose expensive newer treatments including robotic surgery and a radiation treatment called intensity-modulated radiotherapy, or IMRT, even though they are not likely to benefit from those treatments, according to a study in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association.

Use of the newer treatments rose from 32 percent to 44 percent between 2004 and 2009 among men with low PSA test scores or other indications that their prostate cancer was slow-growing and didn't pose a threat.

Dr. Greg Zagaja performs prostate surgery using a robot at the University of Chicago Medical Center in 2009. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption M. Spencer Green/AP

Dr. Greg Zagaja performs prostate surgery using a robot at the University of Chicago Medical Center in 2009.

M. Spencer Green/AP

Use also increased among men who were older or in poor health and were likely to die of something other than the cancer. Their use of robotic surgery and radiation therapy almost doubled, from 13 percent to 24 percent. Men older than 65 with low-grade prostate cancer have a 20 percent chance of dying of the cancer in the next 20 years, compared to a 60 percent chance of dying from something else, the researchers said.

Robotic surgery and radiation treatment are marketed heavily as offering fewer side effects and easier recovery, but as with most new treatments there's little evidence that they are better than established treatments.

The new treatments for prostate cancer are much more expensive than traditional forms of surgery and radiation, and are drawing increasing scrutiny from payers like Medicare. The data for this study came from Medicare records of treatment for more than 83, 000 men who had not been diagnosed with other forms of cancer.

So cost is a concern. But more troubling is the idea of men choosing treatments they don't need, robot or no robot, that can have harmful side effects.

"For men with low risk, observation would be preferred to intervention, whether with robotic surgery, traditional prostate surgery, or IMRT, " says Dr. Timothy Wilt, a researcher for the Veterans Administration who studies treatments for prostate cancer but wasn't involved in this study. Despite that, he notes, "patients are receiving and doctors are recommending treatments that are no more effective, no safer, and much more costly."



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