Les Paul Robot Guitar [Mechanical engineering]

Les Paul Robot Guitar

Hands-On Review: Gibson Robot Guitar

Yes, Virginia, there is a guitar that tunes itself!

By Dan Day
Musician’s Friend Staff Writer

Like many of you, I’m just a little skeptical when somebody announces they have a guitar that tunes itself, even if that somebody is Gibson. I’ve got some questions I want answered: Is this system going to be big, clunky, and ugly? Does it do open tunings? Can I add my custom tunings? And will it really tune my guitar quickly and accurately? Is it easy to use? Until now, there have been several daunting requirements in the design of a self-tuning guitar. You need to have microprocessers that are small and lightweight yet are sensitive to accurately detect the pitch of the guitar strings tuning and smart enough to calculate how much the strings need to be adjusted to achieve the desired tuning. You need powerful yet lightweight motors to adjust the tuners. The self-tuning system should be visually integrated into the guitar. And, perhaps most critically, all of this technology should not be too expensive. If you’re in a hurry for answers, I can tell you the Gibson Robot Guitar really does work—surprisingly well, in fact.

The basics

The Robot Guitar features Gibson’s 490R/498T pickup combo, just like a Les Paul Custom. The 490R’s Alnico II magnet delivers that warm, solidbody sound, with a slight, upper-midrange boost. The 498T has an Alnico V magnet. It’s noticeably hotter, with a crisp high-end. The body of the Les Paul version is the traditional mahogany back/maple top, but it’s chambered for light weight. Like all Gibsons, this guitar has a nitrocellulose clear coat.

Gibson Robot SG Special Headstock and Powerhead Locking Tuners

Viewed from the front, the Robot Guitar looks like a regular Les Paul or SG. Closer examination reveals the three major components of the self-tuning system: the Master Control Knob (MCK), Powerhead locking tuners, and the Tune-Control bridge.

Here’s the basic operation: The MCK is used to select standard or open tunings including E, G, and DADGAD. The strings are lightly strummed. The control bridge monitors the pitch of the strings and instructs the motorized tuning keys to adjust the strings until the MCK blinks blue to indicate they are in tune.

See also:
  • http://southafricatoday.net www.iqoption.com.


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FAQ

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has anyone seen the Gibson Les Paul and SG Robot guitars? | Yahoo Answers

i've seen videos of them, looks pretty cool. but i wouldn't spend 4000 on any guitar.

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Can you put an automatic tuning system into a Gibson Les Paul Electric Guitar, like the one in the Robot? | Yahoo Answers

It is not available as an aftermarket retro-fit. It can only be done at one of the Gibson factories and it is very expensive. To find out more contact Gibson U.S.A.

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