Aero Mechanical Engineering [Mechanical engineering]

Aero Mechanical Engineering

Aero-Mechanical Engineering MEng

Mechanical engineers are recognised for their knowledge and skills in conceiving, designing, implementing and operating devices, machines, engines and energy systems.

You'll learn how to design aircraft engines, control systems, landing gear and about the many complex parts which sustain flight.

Many of the aero-related topics, such as aerodynamics and lightweight structures, are of special interest and value to a wide variety of engineering activities outside the field of aeronautics.

Graduates from the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering - which is consistently rated in the top 10 such departments in the UK - are part of a new breed of engineer who can take on challenges ranging from traditional industries to areas such as new materials, sustainable development and aerospace.

Study abroad is an option for all Mechanical Engineering courses.

What you’ll study

The majority of our students follow five-year MEng courses. All students experience the same learning pace in the first two years and BEng students can, and often do, transfer to the MEng programme. The Aero-Mechanical courses diverge from the core earlier to develop specialist themes.

Studying MEng Aero-Mechanical Engineering you'll learn about:

  • aerodynamics
  • flight and spaceflight mechanics
  • aero-propulsion systems
  • gas dynamics
  • computational fluid dynamics
  • materials for aerospace applications
  • aero-elasticity
  • lightweight structures

Formula Student

Many of our students take part in Formula Student, the national competition to build a Formula Student racing car, (at which Strathclyde is the top-performing Scottish university).

Other activities include the Outdoor Management Skills course at Outward Bound Scotland, the British Model Flying Association’s University Challenge, and ‘Gala, ’ the annual employers’ networking dinner.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Compulsory classes

Knowledge of mechanics is a fundamental tool for a mechanical engineer. This introductory class aims to investigate classical mechanics - force, motion, energy, work and momentum – from a conceptual viewpoint to understand how these are connected and how they can be applied, through formal problem solving, to real-world engineering.

Mechanical systems rely upon electrical and electronic circuits for many reasons: the delivery of drive power; sensing temperature, pressure etc.; the delivery of sensor data for condition monitoring, control and operation. This course covers how external data is acquired, conditioned and used and will equip students with an understanding of the basic theories underlying electronics.



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FAQ

avatar
Is it better to be a Mechanical or Aero-Mechanical Engineer? | Yahoo Answers

Aeronautical Engineering is really a part of mechanical engineering that specializes in fluids (air is a fluid) and light strong structures.
Engineers are problem solvers. You select your major based on the problems you think you want to solve. And the classes and labs that make the most sense. Pay is about the same, but Aeronautical Engineering is a smaller field, and sometimes there are no jobs, and you have to switch your areas. I know one Aeronautical Engineer who despises planes and designs electric transmission lines.
The first two years is the same mostly. Two years of calculus…

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