Intro to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics [Mechanical engineering]

Intro to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics Hardcover – Nov 12 2004

..but you were probably assigned this for class instead or as well, since Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott's text does cover more material than Felder and Rousseau (Fugacity, vapor-liquid equilibrium, improved gas laws/correlations, et cetera). The tables in this book are pretty good, there's a lot of information there. The main problems with this book are organization and clarity. It feels like this book was written assuming you start reading at the front towards the back, and remember EVERYTHING covered. It's a little frustrating spending 20+ minutes trying to track down the relevant information needed to frame your equations. The Peng-Robinson equation(s) are scattered over a whole chapter, for a mild example. The information is there, but finding the relevant parts while weeding out the rest without getting confused is a challenge.

8 of 9 people found the following review helpfulLots of words little real explanation Jan. 1 2012

By C. Drouganis -

I understand that this topic requires a lot of explanation. This textbook although verbose didn't cover much ground after introducing the topic. Often you will have a good explanation and example and then as the problem gets more difficult steps begin to be skipped by the author making it difficult to actually learn how to master the complicated questions given by your instructor. I feel that this book needs a substantial amount of work. It may have a lot of good information but lacks the ability to convey it to the student.

7 of 8 people found the following review helpfulPretty good for a book you grow to hate Feb. 15 2008

By M. Lapaire - Carlos's Review Sept. 23 2008

By Carlos Bucaram Carbo -

This edition of the Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics is much more friendly version to the reader than former ones. It also has more industry related problems. Another change with respect to the former ones is that The example problems are exposed and solved in the SI system of units, which is a more globally used system than the English one.

It is a classic book for chemical engineers and a must read book either as a main textbook or as an alternate textbook, for anyone planning to do undergraduate or graduate thermodynamic courses in that discipline.



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FAQ

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What is internal combustion engines.

Internal Combustion, the fundamentals, are the powerplant in your car. The term Internal Combustion is from the fuel/air mixture combusting , actually exploding is more accurate in the "cylinder" which when the fuel/air is ignited by the spark plug (we are discussing gasoline engines here) . The piston is in the cylinder. While running, the piston is forced up with both valves closed and ignited, and the explosion drives the piston down, to a crankshaft, that creates torque on the crankshaft, and therefore a spinning motion converted from a vertical motion of the piston. I have always b…

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how does the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics apply to an internal combustion engine? | Yahoo Answers

the 1st and 2nd law are used for the calculation of the fuel of the engine and by them you know the state and fuel properties (press.,temp.,vol.) for each strock of the engine
from press. we can find and knw the engine power cause this press. is what push the piston ond provite the power
the temp. is important because it is needed to be known to know the amount of cooling needed and allso because is is one of the knock causes
the volume needed when detirmining the volumatric eff. (which effect several things in the engine)

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